Spiritual Training

Spiritual Training X2

August 24 - Evening

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August 1 - Evening

"As the deer pants for streams of water, so my soul pants for you, my God. My soul thirsts for God, for the living God. When can I go and meet with God? My tears have been my food day and night, while people say to me all day long, 'Where is your God?' These things I remember as I pour out my soul: how I used to go to the house of God under the protection of the Mighty One with shouts of joy and praise among the festive throng. Why, my soul, are you downcast? Why so disturbed within me? Put your hope in God, for I will yet praise him, my Savior and my God."
- Psalms 42:1-5

Longing to Once Again Join the Worship Band


Psalm 42 begins “Book Two” of the collection of Hebrew psalms (Psalms 42-72). It is an accepted interpretation that Psalm 42 and 43 were originally one psalm. The reason for their division is unknown, but it could have been for liturgical purposes. The several reasons for understanding them to be two parts of the same psalm is:

1. Psalm 42 is titled, but Psalm 43 is not titled. You will notice that all of the psalms in “Book Two” of the psalms (Psalms 42-72) have titles with the only other exception being the next to last psalm in “Book Two,” which is Psalm 71. But, even Psalm 71 seems to be connected to Psalm 70 since it serves as an introduction to Psalm 71.
2. Hebrew manuscripts themselves exist that present Psalm 42 and 43 as a single psalm.
3. The same chorus is repeated three times after each of the three sets of verses which are presented like this:
  1. Stanza #1 (Psalm 42:1-4)
  2. Chorus (Psalm 42:5)
  3. Stanza #2 (Psalm 42:6-10)
  4. Chorus repeated (Psalm 42:11)
  5. Stanza #3 (Psalm 43:1-4)
  6. Chorus repeated (Psalm 43:5)

Psalm 42 is about someone being separated from the worship of God for some reason. It appears the separated writer was one of the Levites from the family of Korah who may have been physically removed from worshipping the presence of the Lord at the temple in Jerusalem because of exile, expulsion, uncleanness, sickness, travel or some other unknown reason.

The second best thing to being there for the Levitical worship service was the memory of having once been part of the “procession to the house of God….among the festive throng.” (Psalm 42:4) At least this person could recall better times of being in the midst of the crowd worshipping God as he sang and performed skillfully on his musical instrument.

This Levite compares his desire to worship God to the desire of a deer for water. This water is called “streams of water” which is known as moving water or living water in contrast to stagnant pools of stale water. So, of course, the psalmist compares the deer searching for streams of living water to his soul’s desire “for God, for the living God.” (Psalm 42:1-2) It is interesting to note that in this second book of Psalms the writers typically refer to “God”, or Elohim, instead of “Lord”, YHWH.

The chorus that is repeated three times voices the hope of the psalmist as he speaks to his own self that he will again “yet praise him, my Savior and my God.” (Psalm 42:5, 11 and Psalm 43:5)
Hupodeiknumi (Gr) – Warn (Eng) – a Greek word which comes from hupo meaning “under” and deiknumi meaning “to show.” Together hupo-deiknumi, “to show under” means “to give information,” “to share a private tip,” and “to point out” (as in Luke 3:7). The idea of hupodeiknumi can refer to thoughts making their way into the mind where they can be understood.
Today I will begin to be thankful for the great things that have happened in my past. I will remember the goodness of the Lord that I have already experience.



Bible Reading Descriptions Here

Narrative

(morning only)

Complete Text

General Text




Personal

An elderly person

Church

Vision of potential
Local economy
Germany



Original stone carvings and decoration from Herod's New Testament Temple time in the jamb of the Triple Gate in the south wall of the Temple Mount retaining wall. People visiting the Temple in the New Testament would have walked past this decorated gate jamb and ascended the stairs behind the blocked entrance on the right side of this photo to enter the Jewish Temple courts. (Details, Photo)
Details of the account of Deborah in
Judges chapter 4 on a map




Someone to Quote

(On taking an oath to uphold Magna Carta in 1253...)
"All these things shall I keep faithfully and undiminished, as a man, as a Christian, as a soldier, and as a king, crowned and anointed."
- Henry III (1207-1272),
King of England

Something to Ponder

Use these online flash cards to study and review the names of the Assyrian gods, then take the test -
Flash Cards and Test HERE

Here’s a Fact

Critics of Moses’ authorship of Exodus in 1400 BC instead assign the origins of the book of Exodus to the Jewish exiles in Babylon around 500-400 BC. The problem with the critics rejecting a 1400 BC date is the overwhelming amount of accurate details of Egyptian life, culture and land (slave-labor practice, royal court proceedings, Flora, fauna, language, geography of Egyptian) from the time of the Exodus. It is hard to imagine an author in Babylon 1000 years after the exodus writing a story that contains such an apparent familiarity with a land he had never seen from an age he had never lived in.

Proverb

"The way of the Lord is a refuge for the righteous,
but it is the ruin of those who do evil."

- Proverbs 10:29

Coach’s Corner

The greatest miracle is salvation. The godliest spiritual manifestation is the transformed soul.

"The hand of the Lord was on me, and he brought me out by the Spirit of the Lord and set me in the middle of a valley; it was full of bones. He led me back and forth among them, and I saw a great many bones on the floor of the valley, bones that were very dry.

He asked me, 'Son of man, can these bones live?'

I said, 'Sovereign Lord, you alone know.'

Then he said to me, 'Prophesy to these bones and say to them, "Dry bones, hear the word of the Lord!"... '

...So I prophesied as he commanded me, and breath entered them; they came to life and stood up on their feet—a vast army.

Then he said to me: 'Son of man, these bones are the people of Israel. They say, "Our bones are dried up and our hope is gone; we are cut off."...'

...and say to them, ‘This is what the Sovereign Lord says: I will take the Israelites out of the nations where they have gone. I will gather them from all around and bring them back into their own land. I will make them one nation in the land, on the mountains of Israel. There will be one king over all of them and they will never again be two nations or be divided into two kingdoms.' "

- Ezekiel 37:1-5; 10-11; 21-22

Ezekiel's Speaks God's Word to the Valley of Dry Bones


One of the encouraging portions of Ezekiel’s book are his words of hope for Israel and their restoration in the distant future. This restoration seems to be speaking of something greater than the return from Babylonian exile in 539 BC. Ezekiel’s words must be read and studied carefully while comparing the text to other portions of scripture and historical events that have already transpired.

In this apocalyptic vision of the dry bones recorded in Ezekiel 37 the Lord leads Ezekiel through a valley full of dry bones while asking Ezekiel questions and commanding him to prophecy the words the Lord gives him. Each time Ezekiel speaks the words he is commanded the condition of the bones changes and the climate of the valley improves.

Ezekiel is told at different times to speak these words of prophecy:

  1. “O dry bones, hear the word of the Lord. Thus says the Lord God to these bones: ‘Behold, I will cause breath to enter you, and you shall live. And I will lay sinews upon you, and will cause flesh to come upon you, and cover you with skin, and put breath in you, and you shall live, and you shall know that I am the Lord.’ ”Ezekiel 37:4-6
  2. “Prophesy to the breath; prophesy, son of man, and say to the breath, 'Thus says the Lord God: Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe on these slain, that they may live.’ ”Ezekiel 37:9

Ezekiel was asked by the Lord “can these bones live?” (Ezekiel 37:3) Ezekiel knew enough to balance his faith in God’s ability with his understanding of God’s sovereign will, so Ezekiel replied,

“O Sovereign Lord, you alone know.”  - Ezekiel 37:3

Which is to say,

“Yes, they can live again, but only if you cause them to live again. So, I know they can live again, but only you know if you will cause them to live again.” (- a Wiemers’ paraphrase!)

Then, through Ezekiel’s pronouncement of the Lord’s word, these bones lived again and became a great nation. A nation born again.

It seems this vision yet awaits its ultimate fulfillment. Does it speak of Israel’s natural restoration as a nation which is followed by a national awaking to the Gospel leading to their new birth into salvation? (Zechariah 12:10-13:2; Romans 11:25-32)


Katartismos (Gr) – perfecting (Eng) – the Greek word katartismos  is used in Ephesians 4:12 to mean “to put in order,” “to restore,” “to furnish,” “to prepare,” and “to equip.” Katartismos has the basic meaning of restoration and is a technical term used in the medical field for the setting of bone. In Matthew the word katartizo is used to refer to reaping fishing nets.  In 2 Corinthians 13:9 katartisis is used with a moral meaning to refer to a process leading to growth and preparation for service:

“For we cannot do anything against the truth, but only for the truth. We are glad whenever we are weak but you are strong; and our prayer is that you may be fully restored. This is why I write these things when I am absent.”2 Corinthians 13:8-10
I will speak God's Word and trust his character in situations today.
I do not know what the sovereign Lord will do, but I know that whatever he does will honor his word and his character.


Bible Reading Descriptions Here

Narrative

(morning only)

Complete Text

General Text

Esther 8 (474 BC)


Personal

Spiritual gift

Church

Obedience
Mali
President


South wall and the Southeast corner (right side) of the Temple Mount.
Diagram illustrating the believer's positional relationship with God and their temporal fellowship with God.
(More teaching on Soteriology.)
Esther 8 New International Version (NIV)
The King’s Edict in Behalf of the Jews
That same day King Xerxes gave Queen Esther the estate of Haman, the enemy of the Jews. And Mordecai came into the presence of the king, for Esther had told how he was related to her. The king took off his signet ring, which he had reclaimed from Haman, and presented it to Mordecai. And Esther appointed him over Haman’s estate.
Esther again pleaded with the king, falling at his feet and weeping. She begged him to put an end to the evil plan of Haman the Agagite, which he had devised against the Jews. Then the king extended the gold scepter to Esther and she arose and stood before him.
“If it pleases the king,” she said, “and if he regards me with favor and thinks it the right thing to do, and if he is pleased with me, let an order be written overruling the dispatches that Haman son of Hammedatha, the Agagite, devised and wrote to destroy the Jews in all the king’s provinces. For how can I bear to see disaster fall on my people? How can I bear to see the destruction of my family?”
King Xerxes replied to Queen Esther and to Mordecai the Jew, “Because Haman attacked the Jews, I have given his estate to Esther, and they have impaled him on the pole he set up. Now write another decree in the king’s name in behalf of the Jews as seems best to you, and seal it with the king’s signet ring—for no document written in the king’s name and sealed with his ring can be revoked.”
At once the royal secretaries were summoned—on the twenty-third day of the third month, the month of Sivan. They wrote out all Mordecai’s orders to the Jews, and to the satraps, governors and nobles of the 127 provinces stretching from India to Cush. These orders were written in the script of each province and the language of each people and also to the Jews in their own script and language. 10 Mordecai wrote in the name of King Xerxes, sealed the dispatches with the king’s signet ring, and sent them by mounted couriers, who rode fast horses especially bred for the king.
11 The king’s edict granted the Jews in every city the right to assemble and protect themselves; to destroy, kill and annihilate the armed men of any nationality or province who might attack them and their women and children, and to plunder the property of their enemies. 12 The day appointed for the Jews to do this in all the provinces of King Xerxes was the thirteenth day of the twelfth month, the month of Adar. 13 A copy of the text of the edict was to be issued as law in every province and made known to the people of every nationality so that the Jews would be ready on that day to avenge themselves on their enemies.
14 The couriers, riding the royal horses, went out, spurred on by the king’s command, and the edict was issued in the citadel of Susa.
The Triumph of the Jews
15 When Mordecai left the king’s presence, he was wearing royal garments of blue and white, a large crown of gold and a purple robe of fine linen. And the city of Susa held a joyous celebration. 16 For the Jews it was a time of happiness and joy, gladness and honor. 17 In every province and in every city to which the edict of the king came, there was joy and gladness among the Jews, with feasting and celebrating. And many people of other nationalities became Jews because fear of the Jews had seized them.
New International Version (NIV)
Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by
Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.
Jeremiah 52 New International Version (NIV)
The Fall of Jerusalem
52 Zedekiah was twenty-one years old when he became king, and he reigned in Jerusalem eleven years. His mother’s name was Hamutal daughter of Jeremiah; she was from Libnah. He did evil in the eyes of the Lord, just as Jehoiakim had done. It was because of the Lord’s anger that all this happened to Jerusalem and Judah, and in the end he thrust them from his presence.
Now Zedekiah rebelled against the king of Babylon.
So in the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, on the tenth day of the tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon marched against Jerusalem with his whole army. They encamped outside the city and built siege works all around it. The city was kept under siege until the eleventh year of King Zedekiah.
By the ninth day of the fourth month the famine in the city had become so severe that there was no food for the people to eat. Then the city wall was broken through, and the whole army fled. They left the city at night through the gate between the two walls near the king’s garden, though the Babylonians were surrounding the city. They fled toward the Arabah, but the Babylonian army pursued King Zedekiah and overtook him in the plains of Jericho. All his soldiers were separated from him and scattered, and he was captured.
He was taken to the king of Babylon at Riblah in the land of Hamath, where he pronounced sentence on him.
10 There at Riblah the king of Babylon killed the sons of Zedekiah before his eyes; he also killed all the officials of Judah. 11 Then he put out Zedekiah’s eyes, bound him with bronze shackles and took him to Babylon, where he put him in prison till the day of his death.
12 On the tenth day of the fifth month, in the nineteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, Nebuzaradan commander of the imperial guard, who served the king of Babylon, came to Jerusalem. 13 He set fire to the temple of the Lord, the royal palace and all the houses of Jerusalem. Every important building he burned down. 14 The whole Babylonian army, under the commander of the imperial guard, broke down all the walls around Jerusalem. 15 Nebuzaradan the commander of the guard carried into exile some of the poorest people and those who remained in the city, along with the rest of the craftsmen and those who had deserted to the king of Babylon. 16 But Nebuzaradan left behind the rest of the poorest people of the land to work the vineyards and fields.
17 The Babylonians broke up the bronze pillars, the movable stands and the bronze Sea that were at the temple of the Lord and they carried all the bronze to Babylon. 18 They also took away the pots, shovels, wick trimmers, sprinkling bowls, dishes and all the bronze articles used in the temple service. 19 The commander of the imperial guard took away the basins, censers, sprinkling bowls, pots, lampstands, dishes and bowls used for drink offerings—all that were made of pure gold or silver.
20 The bronze from the two pillars, the Sea and the twelve bronze bulls under it, and the movable stands, which King Solomon had made for the temple of the Lord, was more than could be weighed. 21 Each pillar was eighteen cubits high and twelve cubits in circumference; each was four fingers thick, and hollow. 22 The bronze capital on top of one pillar was five cubits high and was decorated with a network and pomegranates of bronze all around. The other pillar, with its pomegranates, was similar. 23 There were ninety-six pomegranates on the sides; the total number of pomegranates above the surrounding network was a hundred.
24 The commander of the guard took as prisoners Seraiah the chief priest, Zephaniah the priest next in rank and the three doorkeepers. 25 Of those still in the city, he took the officer in charge of the fighting men, and seven royal advisers. He also took the secretary who was chief officer in charge of conscripting the people of the land, sixty of whom were found in the city. 26 Nebuzaradan the commander took them all and brought them to the king of Babylon at Riblah. 27 There at Riblah, in the land of Hamath, the king had them executed.
So Judah went into captivity, away from her land.
28 This is the number of the people Nebuchadnezzar carried into exile:
in the seventh year, 3,023 Jews;
29 in Nebuchadnezzar’s eighteenth year,
832 people from Jerusalem;
30 in his twenty-third year,
745 Jews taken into exile by Nebuzaradan the commander of the imperial guard.
There were 4,600 people in all.
Jehoiachin Released
31 In the thirty-seventh year of the exile of Jehoiachin king of Judah, in the year Awel-Marduk became king of Babylon, on the twenty-fifth day of the twelfth month, he released Jehoiachin king of Judah and freed him from prison. 32 He spoke kindly to him and gave him a seat of honor higher than those of the other kings who were with him in Babylon. 33 So Jehoiachin put aside his prison clothes and for the rest of his life ate regularly at the king’s table. 34 Day by day the king of Babylon gave Jehoiachin a regular allowance as long as he lived, till the day of his death.
New International Version (NIV)
Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by
Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.
“When I am secure in Christ, I can afford to take a risk in my life. Only the insecure cannot afford to risk failure. The secure can be honest about themselves; they can admit failure; they are able to seek help and try again. They can change.” – John Maxwell


Christianity is not based on Jesus’ teachings but on Jesus, who he is, the person of Christ, the Son of God. Salvation is not in the teachings of Jesus but in Jesus himself.


1 Chronicles 10:10 says the Philistines put Saul’s armor in the “temple of their gods”:
“They put his armor in the temple of their gods and hung up his head in the temple of Dagon.”
1 Chronicles 10:10
First Samuel 31:10 says it was the “temple of the Ashtoreths” in Beth Shean. The excavation of the remains of Beth Shean from the time of Saul and David has revealed three Canaanite temples that were in use by the Philistines at Beth Shean at the time of Saul’s death. (Details 1, 2, 3.)


"It will go well with those who convict the guilty,
    and rich blessing will come on them."

- Proverbs 24:25




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